2017

Chronology of what was authored in the year, 2017

Seattle Peoples' Internet, 1992-1999

Article, Date: 2017-11-26
Revised: 2017-11-26

In 1996, we launched the Seattle Peoples' Internet by co-locating our equipment at an upstart internet cafe in Belltown called Speakeasy.

The deal was that we paid for their most expensive monthly line item: the T1 circuit. We covered 100% of the T1 monthly cost yet were allocated only 50% of the bandwidth, if I recall. We recruited enough co-op members to cover that fee before beginning and had a wait-list on Day One.

Our PortMaster was configured to monitor monthly bandwidth consumption per co-op member. We accommodated spikes in traffic of individual members, but if the aggregate went above some threshold, the co-op would pay more to Speakeasy.

The intent here was that our overage fees would help pay for a second T1, thereby adding redundancy and increasing opportunities for peering.

We also had some co-location hosts in their rack, which was around the corner from the coffee machine in those days.

Member fee schedule was proportional to type/speed of connection used and anticipated usage. Beyond that, membership was at cost.

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Seattle Peoples' Internet, 1992-1999

Play It Again, Sam: What may be learned from the Mandela Effect?

Essay, Date: 2017-08-19
Revised: 2017-08-24

Inquiring about when someone recalls first having observed a Mandela Effect leads to an interesting series of questions.

Many only come to learn of all this once someone else points it out. Some then confirm for themselves.

Others however have strong recollections of something being changed at a specific point of time in the past.

Divergent historical accounts go back much further than the term "Mandela Effect" being coined.

However, what may we learn using the Mandela Effect as catalyst?

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Play It Again, Sam: What may be learned from the Mandela Effect?

Improve SEO Ranking

Article, Date: 2017-07-11
Revised: 2017, 2018

Help people find your content, and do this by accommodating where they are likely to initiate their search. Then, help the spyders and algorithms across the various platforms so these beasts in turn can help the people you are trying to reach.

These are tips and tricks from successful Search Engine Optimization (SEO).

This is an amalgamation from different points of view, from practitioners spanning Silicon Valley, Poland's tech sector, Vancouver and beyond.

A few minutes of planning your website's structure can yield substantial dividends of good placement on Search Engine Results Pages (SERP) of Google as well as other search engines.

Think of social media as increasing opportunities for both people and search engine spyders to find your main content.

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Improve SEO Ranking

Add Or Change One Thing At A Time

Essay, Date: 2017-06-16
Revised: 2018-01-12

Conceptually, add or change only one thing at a time, else confuse your customers.

Imagine if the iPhone had been released ten years earlier.

Would it have failed? Arguably, yes! At minimum, adoption would have taken much, much longer.

The market wasn't ready. Not enough of the mass population in the US or likely elsewhere would have accepted it much earlier, except for maybe in Japan.

Features of the iPhone would have been too foreign to most markets, even if all technology was readily available. Much of it was available earlier, but Apple Newton and Palm PDAs of 1990's didn't attain heights of success of the iPhone. Why?

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Add Or Change One Thing At A Time

Boutique Studio Model

Posits, Date: 2017-06-12
Revised: 2018-01-13

There was a startup circa 1999 in New York City that ultimately failed, not because of the dot-com bubble bursting a year later but because of getting localization wrong.

Based in NYC because that's where the money and enough talent resided, their target customers were the general populations of Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese speaking Central and South America.

The irony is that even with a founder and CEO from one of their target countries and many, many immigrants from each and every one of the intended nations, they still fumbled on localization ther.

By the time this lesson was learned, however, it was too late to adjust despite already having an IPO and secondary offering of public stock as well.

If a company of well over 300 employees with in-house talent— in this case for translation and localization— still got it wrong, what hope might an upstart company have?

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Boutique Studio Model

Miscommunication & Misunderstanding:
Two Sides of the Same Coin

Posits, Date: 2017-06-11
Revised: 2018-04-23

Miscommunication and misunderstanding are two sides of the same coin.

It takes two to Tango, and clear communication is no different.

Miscommunication implies that what was said or written missed the mark regarding the actual audience.

Misunderstanding reflects a disconnect in what or how something was expressed, such that the meaning received differed from what was intended.

Neither side is really to be blamed, provided the matter gets rectified.

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Miscommunication & Misunderstanding: Two Sides of the Same Coin

Release Early, Release Often

Posits, Date: 2017-06-10
Revised: 2018-04-23

Make rapid, iterative releases.

Even if only for internal purposes such as a candidate for official deployment, issuing small releases builds upon the notion of adding or changing only one thing at a time.

All of this, however, is an extension of where and how to begin.

Start with a trivial system that represents the main workflow or dataflow. As the very first version, the system does nothing but does it correctly.

Then give it data. Perhaps begin with fixed values hard-coded rather than loading from storage, because costs involved with reading bits off disk or network is an additional step in itself beyond dealing with the data. There may be something to discover about the data structure first.

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Release Early, Release Often

Show, Don't Tell

Posits, Date: 2017-06-10
Revised: 2018-04-23

Many good writers advise "show, don't tell," and so with software: construct enough to illustrate the most unique elements first as proof-of-concept.

When working with the principal of an organization such as CEO or Director of a division, various business ideas would need to be vetted. While one person would validate it by talking with potential customers, another question was equally important to answer: is it technically feasible?

These were companies that were often on the leading edge in their space or taking strides to get there— blue chip companies and upstarts less than six months old alike.

In a few instances, this principal would state the need for something that does A, B, C, D— go!

There's a huge difference between what someone says they want versus what they actually need.

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Show, Don't Tell

Fail Fast

Posits, Date: 2017-06-09

Write the hardest parts first. If you're going to fail, do it quickly so that you may more intelligently begin again or move on to what's next.

What is most unique about the proposed product?

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Fail Fast

Errors, Not Bugs

Posits, Date: 2017-06-09
Revised: 2018-04-23

Call them programming errors— not bugs.

Calling them "bugs" is at best hearkening back to earlier era of electro-mechanical devices, possibly the era of vacuum tub computing, or at worst is a denial of responsibility.

If you wrote the code that contains the mistake, take ownership of that fact by identifying it as a programming error— your programming error.

Maybe it was an error in logic. Maybe it was a typo. Maybe a related but incorrect function was invoked. Maybe it was an error of omission. Maybe something from the criteria or specifications were misstated or misunderstood.

Identifying mistakes as bugs, some go all the way and use anthropomorphic terms, give them names, and contemplate their personality disorders. References to pathological bugs, stubborn bugs, persistent bugs and so on, are often heard at status meetings. This emphasizes the wrong mindset.

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Errors, Not Bugs

Timeline, interrupted

Fiction, Date: 2017-05-28

He woke one day in a state of mourning but didn't know why. It felt as if Peter's beloved newlywed wife had passed away, yet there she was sipping coffee on the couch, combing one of the cats. The other had been napping at foot of the bed, and after a stretch, curled into another ball of fluff for her next nap.

With everyone accounted for, he asked himself what was this emotion?

What is the cause?

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Timeline, interrupted

Storyboard Template: 1 page 3x4 grid

Template, Date: 2017-04-13

Each frame uses 16x9 aspect ratio on North American 8.5x11 inch paper with margins.

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Storyboard Template: 1 page 3x4 grid

Storyboard Template: 1 page 3x2 grid

Template, Date: 2017-04-13

Each frame uses 16x9 aspect ratio on North American 8.5x11 inch paper with margins.

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Storyboard Template: 1 page 3x2 grid
Copyright © 2018 Daniel Joseph Pezely
May be licensed via Creative Commons Attribution.